the loner

May 12th, 2010 in member junk     
shamrockerin shamrockerin, member
no recommendations


This is the only thing I found today on my weekly trip to the auction. It's from an old desk (probably 40's-50's by the look of it). I just loved the lines on this piece of molding, but I have absolutely no idea what to do with it.

"There are many things we would throw away, if we were not afraid that others might pick them up" ~Oscar Wilde

I went to the local thrist store today and I found one of those wonderfully tacky brass chandeliers. It is crying for a make-over so I think I'll go back for it later this week. My question is: How do you safely remove the wiring from one of those? Can you just rip it out, or will that leave open-ended wires? I am not planning to use it for electric light, I want to make it a candle-ier but I just want to make sure its safe.


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Comments (8)

CleverJunk writes: I like this piece you found. Might look nice with a narrow piece of wood added right to the top for a shelf. Would make a nice little shelf in an entry with a really cool mirror over it. Posted: 10:10 pm on May 13th
CleverJunk writes: I think the best way to learn how something works is to start taking things apart. Dealing with electrical is perfectly safe if it's not plugged in...don't be afraid to explore. If it's the type of chandelier that looks like candlesticks; just remove the plastic or paper sleeve and you'll see where the wires attach to each "candle". Simply unscrew the wires. Then if you want to remove the candlestick part to replace with real candles, those usually just screw onto the chandelier frame. All those separate arms leading to the candles hold the wires you've disconnected. They all link together somewhere so try to unscrew different parts of the chandelier frame to find where they join. Take them apart and then you can pull the main wire that goes to the plug or would be hard wired in your ceiling. Now you have no more wires to worry about. Just put what you need to back together and viola you have a candelier. Good luck. Posted: 10:08 pm on May 13th
huneydip writes: Also for the trim pc. It would look great over a cherry wood frame with a beautiful oil painting that would be on the old world style and what you would do with the moldiing is place it 3-5 inches above the painting. This way the molding stands out but not alone.

Good Luck! Posted: 10:06 pm on May 12th
huneydip writes: If you know anyone who knows how to do electrical. Buy the cord of the size that you need, add it to the exsisting cord. Place plug on it, buy a hook to place on ceiling. Buy cord cover and if you do not want so much light and you just want the more intimate light like candles, buy flicker bulbs to get the burning candle effect or buy 5-7 watt mini night light bulbs. Less hassle than trying to take apart the whole chandilier.


Good Luck Posted: 10:03 pm on May 12th
Prior writes: very cool trim piece! Lezlee Posted: 6:32 pm on May 12th
SHABBYPATTY writes: I HAVE RIPPED ONE APART EASILY! JUST DON'T PLUG IT IN! I AM IN THE PROCESS OF TURNING OLD SCONCES INTO CANDLE SCONCES SO I RIPPED ALL THE WIRING OUT AND REMOVED THE PAPER SOCKETS. IT CAME WITH ALL THE CRYSTALS SO THAT WAS THE BIGGEST REASON I BOUGHT IT. Posted: 6:01 pm on May 12th
shamrockerin writes: Thank you, Rusty Diva! Like I said, I have no intention to use it as an electric light, but I just wanted to make sure it'd be safe. I'm going to try and go back tomorrow for that wonderfully tacky chandelier- hopefully no one snags it before I get there! ;) Posted: 4:11 pm on May 12th
RustyDiva writes: I feel sorry for the little guy ~ glad you saved him!
I've disassembled 1 chandy and as long as you don't plug it in ~ rip away. You may have to loosen a few parts to get the wiring out and if you're not planning on using the cord on another project you can just cut it out (again don't have it plugged in:) My cord was beyond any reuse so I didn't have to be careful with it. Can't wait to see the transformation! Posted: 1:42 pm on May 12th
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