help me with my beautiful weathered wood!!!

April 28th, 2010 in member junk     
curlyrachel curlyrachel, member
no recommendations

this birdhouse belonged to my grandparents for a long time before it  came to live with us.  it finally gave up the ghost after many years of  faithful service, but i kept the top because i thought i could use it  for something.
this birdhouse belonged to my grandparents for a long time before it  came to live with us.  it finally gave up the ghost after many years of  faithful service, but i kept the top because i thought i could use it  for something.
this red color is just not working for me.  i want to use the wood to mount 3 sand dollars on for hanging in my bedroom, which is turquoise, brown, with pops of pink and orange.
so, can i do anything to make it work?
this red color is just not working for me.  i want to use the wood to  mount 3 sand dollars on for hanging in my bedroom, which is turquoise,  brown, with pops of pink and orange.
so, can i do anything to make  it work?
now, i could probably live with this beautiful chippy paint, but what can i do to keep more from chipping off?
ive heard something about using some kind of wax, but no one ever mentions what kind of wax and how they use it.
help!
this birdhouse belonged to my grandparents for a long time before it  came to live with us.  it finally gave up the ghost after many years of  faithful service, but i kept the top because i thought i could use it  for something.

this birdhouse belonged to my grandparents for a long time before it came to live with us.  it finally gave up the ghost after many years of faithful service, but i kept the top because i thought i could use it for something.

Photo: rachel slack

this birdhouse wood is so beautifully weathered, and i'm dying to use it to mount some sand dollars on, but the color is just not working for me, and i don't want paint chipping everytime i move it, or risk a splinter every time i touch it.

is there anything i can do to change the color but not lose the weathered appearance?  and how can i keep those chips from flaking off?

i'd really appreciate any help or ideas you could give!


Pattern or design used: My own design
posted in: member junk, vintage, wood, industrial, country, paint

Comments (5)

BillyJo writes: I buy old cans of minewax stains in various colors. I apply and then take off. It is oil base vs water that I use but comes in water base too. Then follow what the others here have said. Some one I know uses the husks off Black walnuts soaking in water for a short while. Makes a great water stain with a black walnut smell. Posted: 6:07 pm on May 1st
CleverJunk writes: I love old wood with chippy paint and work with it all the time. There are several things you can try depending on what finish you're looking for. The product I use most often is Fiddes Supreme Wax. You can go online to find a source near you. It's similar to Briwax but with less solvents. It's easy to work with and comes in colors like stain. The color I use most often is Rugger Brown which is like a tobacco color. It gives everything a great antiqued finish but still looks rustic and is the quickest product, I think, because there's really no drying time. If you look at my projects, they almost all have been waxed. It's a paste wax so you just apply it with a cloth or brush like you would stain, wiping off any excess. By the time you're finished applying, it's usually dry enough to buff. I use a pine brush attached to my drill but it can be buffed by hand for a small project like yours. You just buff with a brush or cloth until you reach the desired sheen. It should not be tacky so if it is you just haven't buffed enough. You could also use GelStain by Minwax. The color I use most often for an aged look is Aged Oak. Again, there are many colors and it's readily available. This product is nice because it is a stain and sealer in one; but there is drying time involved. I have a friend that uses encapsulating products to preserve original finishes but I think they are just clear and haven't worked with them myself. Good luck. Posted: 11:13 pm on April 28th
MakinItHappen writes: You can take a scraper like one you'd use for a wall and scrape away what's loose. Be sure not to breathe the dust; wear a mask, in case there's lead in the paint. I use a type of Briwax that is very dark. There are other brands, too. If you still have more red than you want, you could try to wax over it with one of these dark waxes or even shoe polish. Posted: 8:08 pm on April 28th
vanj writes: ARE THERE NOT STAINS THAT YOU CAN WATER DOWN? I WOULD CHECK AT THE HARDWARE STORE OR PAINT STORE. LOTS OF DIFFERENT THINGS TO USE. SOMETIMES I WILL DILUTE WATERBASED LATEX PAINT
AND IT TURNS OUT QUITE WELL. I LOVE THIS PATINA TOO HAVE LOTS OF WOOD LIKE IT. GOOD LUCK
VANESSA Posted: 6:20 pm on April 28th
RustyDiva writes: I've never used the wax but I do use polyurethane. Many coats will keep the chips where they belong. You're right ~ that is a beautiful patina. Posted: 6:10 pm on April 28th
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